Wednesday, September 16, 2009

A Bright Bowl of Swiss Chard


Swiss chard is back at Farmer's Market after the heat of the summer. Red and yellow!

I used to saute it with some crushed garlic but have switched to the simplest, most delicious method of all. After washing and roughly chopping the stems and leaves together, put it in a skillet with half an inch of water and steam over medium heat (covered) until tender--about twelve minutes. Eat it plain or with a little drizzle of balsamic vinegar.

10 comments:

mrs boo radley said...

Beautiful! We have a lot of chard right now, and especially enjoy it with eggs!

Vicky said...

Yum! I've got orange, yellow, pink and red stalks in my garden right now. I like the garlic sautee method, too.

Also, you can steam it your way, then rinse it in cold water and squeeze out the excess, put it on a plate and add a good heaping of sesame seeds, and a drizzle of soy sauce over the top. Super yum. That's called "o-hitashi" in Japanese!

omchelsea said...

gorgeous. i need to know more about how to grow chard.

Mrs. Farrah Ginter said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Lisateresa said...

Mrs Farrah Ginter - It tastes delicious, but I don't know what else to say by way of describing it!

Pitsch Family said...

Thank you for this great suggestion, i recently bought some at our farmers market and wasnt sure how to cook it. The vinegar idea was yummy !

hannah | honey & jam said...

Oh, beautiful!

Obi-Mom Kenobi said...

It's been so cool up here this summer, we've had it at our CSA pickup every single week since June 1. Can you believe it? How lucky is that?!

Margo said...

what? leave out the garlic? I adore garlicky greens. Maybe your new method would taste more like steamed broccoli.

Mama Squirrel said...

I just finished picking some of our chard a few minutes ago! One of the few things that's grown well this summer. To answer Mrs. Farrah, you just let it grow--even if the bugs chew on it, you can still eat the leaves. (Wash it well.) The young baby stuff you can eat raw in salads. When it gets older, you'd probably want to cook it. If the stems are big and tough, you can chop those separately and start them ahead of the leaves.

We like chard because it doesn't have a very strong flavour (comparable to spinach), so it can be used in most spinach recipes. I steam it, chop it, and use it as the green layer in lasagna.

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