Friday, November 18, 2011

Vintage Thanksgiving Inspiration

"The turkey was stuffed and placed in the roasting pan ready for the oven. The celery was cleaned, washed, rolled in a damp napkin, and placed in the refrigerator. The squash, cut and peeled, was left standing in a saucepan of cold water, as were the potatoes and onions. The creamed macaroni, covered with buttered crumbs, was in a baking dish ready for its final browning. Even the tiny sausages which, all brown and crispy, were to garnish the turkey, were ready for the frying pan. . . . Lemon, orange, and pineapple juices were mixed for the mint cup; ginger ale and soda, which were to be added when it was ready to serve, were at hand."

--Emilie Loring, Forever and a Day

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

I read your comment about discovering Emilie Loring novels awhile back. They are my personal favorites in that genre. You might become a bigger fan of hers as you read more of her books. For a description of a traditional New England Thanksgiving Dinner be sure and read Fair Tomorrow.

Shelley said...

Sounds delicious! Fattening, but delicious.

Rebecca said...

I especially love the pre-plastic details: celery wrapped in a damp napkin. How smart!

...they call me mommy... said...

Yum!! I am a total fan of Emilie Loring now thanks to you! :) I'm slowly reading them via the library. Only can get 1 or 2 titles at a time or I don't get anything done! ;)

Julian said...

I am going to see where I can get her books. She sounds like g.l.h. Whom I adore . Cant wait to read!christina

alli said...

i knew you would like the food descriptions:)

Anonymous said...

It always amuses me that in those vintage books they make such a big deal of celery.

Farrah said...

What are you making for Thanksgiving?

I am definitely going to look for Ms. Loring novels at the library. Thank you for the introduction!

Martha A. said...

Emilie Loring books and GLH books all make food that is so simple sound so good!

MrsSM said...

To anonymous--

I don't know when Emilie Loring published her books, but I know around the turn of the 20th century, celery was pretty expensive and at first only available to the very wealthy. Maybe it was still a specialty item at that time, more so than it is today!!

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