Tuesday, June 02, 2015

Raccoons

Raccoons have savagely eaten all of Daisy's chickens. Ugh. Gruesome. We're building a bigger and better coop and will try again soon.

In the meantime, we've borrowed a live trap from the neighbor. The Composer set it out last night with some catfood--while a raccoon was watching from the dark weeds. Three minutes later, she was trapped.

Just to see, he set the trap again tonight. First someone stole in and got half the crunchies. He reset the door five minutes later, and within moments had another raccoon. Both of them have been transported to the lake and set free there. 

I guess we'll set the trap again tomorrow. There may be no end in sight.

20 comments:

Sarah said...

Oh, that's hard! We lost several chickens to raccoons, and it was always so sad. They're sneaky little critters!!

Netajane said...


So frustrating! It happened to our chickens too (a couple years ago) and we haven't had the courage to get more yet.

Susan said...

Horrible! And sad.

I had friends who trapped and moved raccoons, it's not for the faint of heart. And be sure you've moved them far enough away. But you likely already know this.

Rose said...

Oh Anna how awful for Daisy, you, the Composer. It sounds like you are going to need quite a fortress for the chooks. I do hope Daisy -- and all of you -- are recovering from the shock.

Shelley said...

Be careful! Raccoons can carry rabies.

Rain said...

I'm so sorry. I'll never forget the night a fox got most of ours. Hope you get them all.
Peace.

Rachel said...

Ugh. We've had the same experience and trapped several opossums while trying to get the raccoon :/

Like someone else said, just make sure you're taking them far enough away. We were told 10 miles! Otherwise, they will just return again and again.

I'm so sorry, Daisy. It's frustrating to raise chickens for raccoons!

Bonnie said...

Oh poor Daisy! My father-in-law trapped THIRTY raccoons in their yard last year. And yesterday we found out our states Department of Ag canceled ALL poultry shows for this year in an effort to help keep the avian flu at bay, so there went my daughter's market chicken 4-H project.
Chicken troubles everywhere!

Sarah said...

I am so sorry to hear of the loss of your chickens. Growing up I always had chickens. In my late teens I lost all of my chickens to a neighbor's dog. I know how chickens can become grand pets, and their loss is difficult.

jenny_o said...

If there was a female there may be babies somewhere. Nature can be heartbreaking. Hopefully if there are little ones they will find your trap and can be released where the female was let go.

the momma said...

I'm so sorry! I know how heartbreaking this is for Daisy (and you) :-(
Coyotes and hawks are my big predators, and nothing but keeping the chickens locked up at all times (which would be sad) or a Great Pyrenees (or some other similar dog) (which we cannot yet have due to lack of proper fencing) will keep them safe. My optimism sure hasn't... : /

Rachel said...

I know how very heartbreaking this can be. We lost three bantams hens to possums or raccoons Sunday morning and then lost all nine of our baby chicks slaughtered in their pen by some terrible creature. Praying for you all and hope that new chickens will have a secure home soon.

Rachel

Carolyne said...

Since the species is not endangered I am somewhat surprised that their cuteness and cunning cleverness cause people to want to preserve them. We have transported many to distant parks and hollows, only to have them return. (We knew individuals by markings we placed on them after capture. In one summer alone, we used a live-capture trap to catch 83 individuals).
Many people in 'town' like to transport their little 'coons out to our small village, not knowing the frustration of this overabundance.
After learning their "circle of community" can be as large as 12-15 miles, I feel the only way to approach this species is to "manage" the nests. Just like being good stewards of our forests and woodlands, we need to manage herds and smaller species such as this one with wisdom not emotion.

Anonymous said...

First the coyote and now the raccoon. So sorry for Daisy's loss, but she's lucky to have parents who try to work through the challenges.
Nancy

Lisa said...

Where did I get the idea that racoons were vegetarian? What an awful thing.

Lisateresa

Donna said...

I am sorry for the recent loss of your farm pets, how upsetting it must be for everyone.

Anonymous said...

Daisy, I am so sorry! We had some lovely chickens we were raising (one mama hen was sitting on a nest of 9 eggs) when a raccoon came in a wiped them out. The scene was devastating! My then 9 year old daughter was taking piano lessons at the time. Her piano teacher provided her with a new piece to learn. It was about a raccoon that stole chickens and ate them. It was supposed to be a cute light hearted piece (obviously not written by a farmer). My daughter and I just stared at the music dumbfounded while images of our chicken massacre came to mind.
Amy F.

Carol Pack Urban said...

Raccoons will eat everything including cats. Almost all of them carry Rabies. I wouldn't worry about relocating them because I'd shoot them in the trap and bury them deep so another wild animal doesn't dig them up. I know this isn't something you can do in a housing plan but if you live outside of town with relatively few neighbors it isn't a problem.

Thirkellgirl said...

Ugh, poor Daisy. We trapped 11 coons in five months. We learned that they have a roaming range of about five miles, so we took them FAR away to release them. They were hitting the trap about 2 am so releasing them was our "adventurous date night" for a few months. We didn't want to wait until morning and incur the wrath of people who might pass by and not understand that trapping isn't hurtful.

Anonymous said...

Oooo but what if the raccoons have babies right now? I know...Disney has softened my heart to the savage beasties.

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