Friday, January 30, 2009

More Little Milk Glass Gardens


In a south-facing window, a row of milk glass planters hosting the charming succulents known as hens and chickens. Slow, slow, slow to grow--some day the little baby sprouts will fill the rest of the surface, but right now I've only got the hens, no chicks.

7 comments:

Mod Girl said...

Oh, how pretty. I love seeing frosty green in frosty glass.

Anonymous said...

Anna, how do you handle plants' need for drainage in your milk glass gardens? How do you prevent the buildup of salts in the potting soil?

Dinah Soar said...

Years ago I bought one hen..she cost me 50 cents. She started off slow, but once she began producing chicks, I had an endless supply...I planted them everywhere outside my house (I live in a warmer climate). As long as there is some loose dirt and they have plenty of 'threads' on the root they'll grow anywhere with little tending. They are wonderful in rock gardens. And being a succulent, during the drought they were barely affected. I never had to water them.

Once they become profuse you can pop the babies in any old container filled with good dirt and share them.

Jeannie said...

What a wonderful and creative garden...

Anonymous said...

What a nice idea! I have been wanting to get some milk glasses, but didn't know what to put in them. I have some hen n chicks growing in my flowerbed, but wanted to remove them because they blend in with the mulch...now I can combine the two!

debbie bailey said...

Those little planters are so sweet! I love milk glass. As usual, your photos are superb.

Anna said...

When filling a closed-bottom planter, I always fill the bottom with something like marbles or gravel that will allow water to drain to the bottom. Then I make sure to water sparingly. Don't know anything about salts building up--my airplane plants are in very fine health, and have been in their planters for about six months now. If they start to look sickly I'll change the soil, I guess.

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